The Installation Guide: How to Install Vertical Blinds

how to install vertical blinds

While horizontal blinds are more popular than vertical blinds, vertical blinds play a very important role when it comes to covering doors and large windows. Indeed, many homes and apartments feature at least one set of vertical blinds in front of a sliding glass door or another similarly large window. In this ultimate guide, we explain what vertical blinds are and break down the different types of vertical blinds you need to know. Then we explain how to install vertical blinds for both inside and outside mounts.

What Are Vertical Blinds?

Vertical blinds have wide slats that hang down freely from a headrail — the slats are not attached at the bottom and dangle freely. Vertical blinds have much larger slats than horizontal blinds; usually 3-4 inches in width. Slats for vertical blinds may be made out of PVC, fabric or wood composite, similar to many different types of horizontal blinds. Due to the wide slats, vertical blinds are very easy to clean, making them a low-maintenance window treatment.

Vertical blinds are very cost-effective for large, tall and wide windows. For very wide windows, it can be quite expensive to get custom horizontal blinds. However, because vertical blinds are designed for very wide windows, they are often quite affordable blinds even for large windows. Vertical blinds are also ideal for doors because they can be pushed completely to one side or the other. This makes it easy to go in and out of the door without having a blind blocking it at the top.

Learn more about the difference between vertical vs. horizontal blinds here.

types of vertical blinds

Types of Vertical Blinds

When shopping for vertical blinds, there are many different types to choose from. The first thing to consider are the materials:

  • PVC: Vertical blinds made from PVC are probably the most common type of vertical blinds given their durability, affordability and low-maintenance reputation. Faux wood vertical blinds are available in several different designs, from a plain and affordable version to a more upscale model that is patterned to look like fabric. In particular, the more entry-level vertical blinds are well-suited to rental properties, workrooms and other areas that see a lot of hard use. The upgraded PVC vertical blinds are great for private homes with owners who won’t be quite as hard on their vertical blinds.
  • Faux Wood: Faux wood is made from a composite of PVC and real wood fibers. This gives the resulting blinds the look of wood, but the durability and moisture-resistance of PVC, which is very important for vertical blinds that are moved back and forth a lot. If you have horizontal wood blinds in your home and want your vertical blinds to match, then faux wood is an excellent option for you.
  • Fabric: Fabric vertical blinds offer textured fabric slats for a classy, upscale appearance. Some fabric vertical blinds come with the option to add a PVC single-sided channel panel insert backing to enhance durability and light control. Because fabric vertical blinds are not quite as durable or easy to clean as the other options on this list, they are not suited to areas that will see a lot of hard use.

close-up of roller blinds

Fabric is only one element of selecting your vertical blinds. You will need to choose the color of your blinds, which varies depending on which type of material you select. In some cases you may be able to choose the headrail colors as well, but that isn’t always a possibility. You will also need to choose whether you want to inside mount or outside mount your vertical blinds. There are also several cord styles you will need to decide between: either a wand or a cord which can be mounted on the right or left side of the blinds, depending on your preference.

These are also different configurations available for the “stack,” or where the vanes rest when the blind is fully open. Most vertical blinds have a right or left stack, but you can also get a center stack (with the blinds pushed to the center) or a center open (with blinds pushed to both sides). Sometimes you can also get extra vane if you’d like some extra coverage and smaller gaps between the vanes. Finally, you can opt to either have no valance or choose from either a square corner valance or a round corner valance.

Browse Our Collection of Custom Vertical Blinds

How to Install Inside Mount Vertical Blinds

1. First, lay out your blinds and the hardware to ensure you have everything. You will also need the following items from your home toolbox:
      1. Pencil and eraser
      2. Drill and drill bit OR screwdriver, hammer and nail
      3. Tape measure
      4. Leveler
      5. Stepladder
      6. Fasteners for the brackets (wood screws, drywall anchors, etc.)

    2. Make sure the area in front of the window or door is clear of any obstructions so you can place the stepladder in a secure position where it will not wobble.

    3. Unlike some other blinds, where you can hold up the headrail to check the measurements, vertical blinds are often used for wider doors and, thus, are too long for this method. Instead, you will need to position the mountain brackets using measurements. Position the brackets a minimum of 2 ¼ inches in front of the window frame or any projection to ensure the vertical blinds will not hit the glass when fully open. Mounting clips should be set with a maximum space of 30 inches apart from each other. Here is how many mounting brackets you will need, depending on the width of the blinds:
      1. Up to 54”: 2 brackets
      2. 54 -1/8” - 84”: 3 brackets
      3. 84 ⅛” - 108”: 4 brackets
      4. 108 ⅛” - 132”: 5 brackets
      5. 132 ⅛” - 156”: 6 brackets
      6. 156 ⅛” - 180”: 7 brackets

        4. Using the measurements in the prior step, calculate how many brackets you will need and where you will place them. Place the brackets in the appropriate places and mark the location for the screw holes lightly using a pencil, and then set them aside.

        a modern living area with vertical blinds

        5. Create pilot holes for the brackets using a drill and a drill bit. If you do not own a power drill, then you can create pilot holes using a hammer and a small nail. Tap the nail partway into the wall using the hammer, and then pull it out. Screw the brackets into the frame using a drill or screwdriver.

        6. To snap the headrail into the brackets, tilt the headrail toward you and fit the front edge of the headrail into the groove on the front of the brackets. Tilt the headrail backward until it snaps fully into the brackets. Ensure the fit is secure before letting go of the headrail. If you need to remove the headrail for any reason, simply push the release lip up with a flat-head screwdriver.

        7. Once you have confirmed the headrail is secure, it’s time to attach the louvres or vanes (a.k.a. the vertical slats) to the plastic clips that dangle down from the headrail. To do this, push the louver up into the slot on the carrier stem, and then pull slightly straight down to lock in place.

        8. Test the blinds by opening and closing them fully to make sure they slide easily in the headrail. Also test the functionality of the vanes by twisting them back and forth.

        9. Once you have confirmed everything is working, enjoy your new window treatments!

          Can’t Decide Between Vertical vs. Horizontal Blinds? Check Out Our Guide!

          make sure you have these tools

          How to Install Outside Mount Vertical Blinds

          1. First, lay out your blinds and the hardware to ensure you have everything. You will also need the following items from your home toolbox:
            1. Pencil and eraser
            2. Drill and drill bit OR screwdriver, hammer and nail
            3. Tape measure
            4. Leveler
            5. Stepladder
            6. Fasteners for the brackets (wood screws, drywall anchors, etc.)

            2. Make sure the area in front of the window or door is clear of any obstructions so you can place the stepladder in a secure position where it will not wobble.

            3. When installing outside mount blinds, you need to make sure you position them high enough so the vertical blinds will clear the floor by at least ½ inch. Standard wall mount installation brackets are adjustable and provide ½ to 1 ½ inch wall clearance. Determine the height for the top of the bracket (measured from the floor) by adding ½ inch to the blind height, including the headrail, and use that measurement to determine how far from the floor you will need to place the brackets. Lightly mark this position with a pencil.

            A luxury bedroom with vertical blinds

            4. Unlike some other blinds, where you can hold up the headrail to check the measurements, vertical blinds are often used for wider doors and, thus, are too long for this method. Instead, you will need to position the mountain brackets using measurements. Mounting clips should be set with a maximum space of 30 inches apart from each other. Here is how many mounting brackets you will need, depending on the width of the blinds:
              1. Up to 54”: 2 brackets
              2. 54 -1/8” - 84”: 3 brackets
              3. 84 ⅛” - 108”: 4 brackets
              4. 108 ⅛” - 132”: 5 brackets
              5. 132 ⅛” - 156”: 6 brackets
              6. 156 ⅛” - 180”: 7 brackets

                5. Using the measurements in the prior step, calculate how many brackets you will need and where you will place them. Place the brackets in the appropriate places and mark the location for the screw holes lightly using a pencil, and then set them aside.

                6. Create pilot holes for the brackets using a drill and a drill bit. If you do not own a power drill, then you can create pilot holes using a hammer and a small nail. Tap the nail partway into the wall using the hammer, and then pull it out. Screw the brackets into the frame using a drill or screwdriver.

                7. To snap the headrail into the brackets, tilt the headrail toward you and fit the front edge of the headrail into the groove on the front of the brackets. Tilt the headrail backward until it snaps fully into the brackets. Ensure the fit is secure before letting go of the headrail. If you need to remove the headrail for any reason, simply push the release lip up with a flat-head screwdriver.

                8. Once you have confirmed the headrail is secure, it’s time to attach the louvres or vanes (a.k.a. the vertical slats) to the plastic clips that dangle down from the headrail. To do this, push the louver up into the slot on the carrier stem, and then pull slightly straight down to lock in place.

                9. If your blind came with a valance, go ahead and snap the valance clips into place. You’ll need the same number of valance clips as brackets. Then slide the valance into the clips until it locks into place.

                10. Test the blinds by opening and closing them fully to make sure they slide easily in the headrail. Also, test the functionality of the vanes by twisting them back and forth. Make sure the vanes don’t hit the wall or the valance.

                11. Once you have confirmed everything is working, enjoy your new window treatments!

                affordable custom blinds from factory direct blinds

                  If you’re searching for affordable custom vertical blinds, then you’re in the right place. Contact Factory Direct Blinds today to find out what custom options are available for vertical blinds or to get samples of the different materials shipped straight to your home.


                  Image Sources

                  Albina Light/Shutterstock.com

                  MAHA SOMSAK/Shutterstock.com

                    yampi/Shutterstock.com

                    MagMac83/Shutterstock.com

                    Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

                    on_demand_photo_uk/Shutterstock.com

                    kunmom/Shutterstock.com


                    Leave a comment

                    Please note, comments must be approved before they are published